Items filtered by date: July 2022

Wednesday, 27 July 2022 00:00

Heel Pain Can Be Treated!

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

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Athlete’s foot is a pesky affliction of the foot that you may experience at some point in your life. The condition is a kind of fungal infection that is spread in warm, moist environments. Most typically, athlete’s foot can be spread to someone when they walk barefoot in highly-trafficked public areas where the fungus is present such as pool sides and locker rooms. There are several risk factors associated with athlete’s foot. First, if you are someone who usually wears damp or tight-fitting shoes, socks, or stockings, then you are increasing your risk of developing athlete’s foot. Wearing this kind of shoe or sock for prolonged periods can essentially trap the fungus, enabling it to thrive and wreak havoc on your feet. Additionally, if you are someone who suffers from persistently sweaty feet, then you may be at a greater risk of developing athlete’s foot. Those with conditions such as HIV-AIDS who have impaired immune systems are also particularly susceptible to suffering from athlete’s foot, as such individuals have a difficult time fighting off the fungus. If you identify with any of these risk factor groups, it might be a good idea to contact a podiatrist who can help ward off athlete’s foot. 

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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About 6.5 million people in the United States over the age of 40 have peripheral artery disease (PAD). It is a blockage in the arteries that supply blood to the extremities, but the condition is more common in the feet and lower limbs. Risk factors for peripheral artery disease include smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and high cholesterol. People over 60 are at further risk. The most common symptom of PAD is pain in the legs while active, but that subsides after resting. Sores in the legs or feet that don’t heal and cold or numb toes are other symptoms as well. If you believe you may have PAD, please consult a podiatrist for an examination and testing.  

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Kenneth Donovan from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Being overweight or obese can cause a variety of health problems, including issues with your feet and ankles. Extra pounds can mean extra pressure placed on these areas, which may lead to foot pain, plantar fasciitis, arthritis, flat feet, and peripheral edema. Peripheral edema is the medical term for swelling in the feet, ankles, and lower legs. The swelling occurs when there is decreased blood circulation caused by excess body mass which, in turn, leads to an accumulation of fluid in the tissues. Peripheral edema may sometimes be prevented by exercising regularly, reducing salt consumption, and achieving/maintaining a healthier body weight. A podiatrist can provide additional prevention tips for peripheral edema, and use a variety of methods to treat it.


 

The more you weigh, the harder your feet must work to support your body. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and Your Feet

People who are overweight are putting more pressure on their ankles, knees, and hips as well as their feet. This unfortunately can lead to variety of different issues.

Problems & Complications Stemming from Obesity

  • When the body is overweight, it tries to compensate by changing the way that it moves. An obese person may lean forward and put extra weight on the wrong part of the foot. This puts unnecessary stress on the feet.
  • Obese people are also more likely to develop type II diabetes which is a condition that causes a lot of foot problems. People with diabetes often don’t feel the cuts and sores that they may have on their feet, which can lead to more complicated and severe issues.
  • Plantar fasciitis is another foot condition that can be caused by obesity. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, which causes pain and stiffness while walking and climbing stairs.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 06 July 2022 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

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Tuesday, 05 July 2022 00:00

Truck Driving and Plantar Fasciitis

One of the most common causes of heel pain is a condition known as plantar fasciitis. This condition is caused by the straining of the ligament that runs between the toes and the heel. The straining of this ligament can produce sharp and shooting pains in the bottom of the feet that are most prominent when taking your first step after a prolonged period of rest. Many individuals are at a higher risk of suffering from plantar fasciitis. Namely, women who often wear high-heeled shoes are more prone to experiencing plantar fasciitis because of the extra strain that such footwear causes on the heel. However, it may come as a surprise to some that truck drivers are also at a greater risk of experiencing this condition. This can be explained by the fact that truck drivers spend most of their day sitting while driving, but often must suddenly and sporadically engage in physical activity during rest stops before they can properly stretch and re-engage ligaments in their feet. Truck drivers may be able to stave off the effects of plantar fasciitis by regularly stretching foot ligaments and muscles, especially before beginning to walk after a long drive. Truck drivers may also consider opting for more supportive footwear or wearing a heel cup for extra protection. Although some occupations may put individuals at a greater risk of developing plantar fasciitis, a podiatrist may be able to help create a plan to remedy and prevent this condition.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan  from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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