Tuesday, 24 May 2022 00:00

A blister is a fluid-filled bubble that forms on the skin.  Most often these blisters are caused by one toe repeatedly rubbing against another toe or the lining of a shoe and irritating the skin. These are referred to as friction or pinch blisters and can typically be treated at home. Wearing shoes that fit properly, keeping feet clean and dry, and not walking barefoot in warm, humid areas can help prevent friction blisters from forming.  It is important not to pop or pick at a blister as it can become infected, but if it has broken, toes should be soaked in clean, warm water and Epsom salts. If you are unsure which type of blister has formed, you suspect an infection, or if the friction blister is not healing within a reasonable time, it is suggested you consult with a podiatrist to have it evaluated, treated, and to learn how the formation of your blisters can be prevented.

Blisters may appear as a single bubble or in a cluster. They can cause a lot of pain and may be filled with pus, blood, or watery serum. If your feet are hurting, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan of Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters are often the result of friction. This happens due to the constant rubbing from shoes, which can lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

Symptoms

(Blister symptoms may vary depending on what is causing them)

  • Bubble of skin filled with fluid
  • Redness
  • Moderate to severe pain
  • Itching

Prevention & Treatment

In order to prevent blisters, you should be sure to wear comfortable shoes with socks that cushion your feet and absorb sweat. Breaking a blister open may increase your chances of developing an infection. However, if your blister breaks, you should wash the area with soap and water immediately and then apply a bandage to the affected area. If your blisters cause severe pain it is important that you call your podiatrist right away.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

Women are more prone to developing bunions than men. This may be a result of wearing high heels or shoes that do not have adequate room in the toe area. A bunion appears as a bony lump on the side of the big toe and is considered to be a foot deformity. This protrusion causes the bone in the big toe to gradually move toward the other toes and can produce pain and discomfort. People who develop bunions may eventually get osteoarthritis in the big toe, which can be the source of chronic pain. Additionally, the risk of getting a bunion may increase in patients who have short calf muscles or a shortened Achilles tendon, and medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and flat feet. Bunions may be prevented by wearing shoes that are comfortable and flat. It may help to frequently walk barefoot, which may be beneficial in strengthening the muscles in the overall foot. If you have developed a bunion, it is strongly suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can provide you with correct treatment options, which may include surgery for permanent removal. 

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan of Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What Are Bunions?
Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

It is important to maintain proper wound care, and this is especially true in diabetic patients. The body’s healing process may become accelerated when existing wounds are treated correctly. First, the wound needs to be cleaned thoroughly, and this is done by using clean water and mild soap. When gentle pressure is applied, the bleeding will stop. Second, after the wound is clean, it is beneficial to apply an antibiotic ointment to the affected area, followed by covering it with a protective bandage. Serious wounds may require stitches and will need immediate medical attention. People who have diabetes are often careful about checking their feet daily using a mirror, and paying attention to small cuts or bruises on the feet. A podiatrist is often consulted who can treat wounds on the feet, and it is advised that you confer with this type of doctor as quickly as possible to offer you correct treatment options for foot wound care.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Kenneth Donovan from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Wednesday, 04 May 2022 00:00

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