Items filtered by date: November 2017

Tuesday, 28 November 2017 17:34

Why Are My Feet Cold?

The feet may feel cold when there are environmental stresses, such as the temperature dropping. This may cause oxygen deficiency and turn the feet blue in color, a condition called cyanosis. When the natural circulation is restored, this condition disappears. There are other causes of poor blood circulation, including the inability to produce normal levels of red blood cells, commonly known as anemia. Typically, improvement may be achieved through diet, in addition to taking nutritional supplements. Diabetes may be another cause, and this disease can have very serious effects on the feet. It may result in nerve damage, causing the feet to feel cold. If your feet feel cold a lot of the time, a consultation with a podiatrist may be advised.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan of Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

    As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication.

    If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

    Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet

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    Monday, 20 November 2017 17:36

    Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet and Ankles

    It can be painful to walk for those who have rheumatoid arthritis. A large percentage of people diagnosed with this disease may experience pain in their ankles and joints at some point in their lives. Common symptoms may include tenderness, swelling, and difficulty bending the foot. Emotional symptoms may also occur, including feelings of helplessness, anxiety and depression. Excessive fatigue may be another sign of rheumatoid arthritis. When these symptoms are controlled, further damage to tissues and joints may be prevented. Proper medication, when taken correctly, can be effective in managing relief. When early treatment is initiated, the goal of remission is much more likely. Practicing low-impact exercise such as yoga, swimming or walking is beneficial in strengthening the joints and muscles.

    Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan of Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

    What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

    Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

    Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

    Symptoms

    • Swelling and pain in the feet
    • Stiffness in the feet
    • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
    • Joint shift and deformation

    Diagnosis

    Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

    If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

    Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet

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    Wednesday, 15 November 2017 17:37

    Before you start dancing…

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    Wednesday, 15 November 2017 00:00

    Before you start dancing...

     

    Published in Blog
    Monday, 13 November 2017 17:37

    What to Know About a Broken Toe

    One of the first signs you will most likely notice if your toe is broken is a throbbing pain. It may also change color and look bruised. Typically, you may have difficulty putting weight on your toe and walking may be painful or even unbearable. You may even hear the bone break at the time of injury. There are a few common causes of a broken toe, almost always being a type of trauma or injury. Stubbing your toe into something hard or something dropping on it are two very common ways to break a toe. Going barefoot is something you may want to avoid, especially in a dark or unfamiliar area. If you lift heavy objects often then proper foot protection is needed, such as thick boots. If you believe the toe is broken, an X-ray conducted by a podiatrist will likely be taken to receive a proper diagnosis and treatment.

    A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

    What to Know About a Broken Toe

    Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

    Symptoms of a Broken Toe

    • Throbbing pain
    • Swelling
    • Bruising on the skin and toenail
    • The inability to move the toe
    • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
    • Tingling or numbness in the toe

    Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

    Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

    If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

    Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe

    Published in Blog
    Monday, 13 November 2017 00:00

    What to Know About a Broken Toe

    One of the first signs you will most likely notice if your toe is broken is a throbbing pain. It may also change color and look bruised. Typically, you may have difficulty putting weight on your toe and walking may be painful or even unbearable. You may even hear the bone break at the time of injury. There are a few common causes of a broken toe, almost always being a type of trauma or injury. Stubbing your toe into something hard or something dropping on it are two very common ways to break a toe. Going barefoot is something you may want to avoid, especially in a dark or unfamiliar area. If you lift heavy objects often then proper foot protection is needed, such as thick boots. If you believe the toe is broken, an X-ray conducted by a podiatrist will likely be taken to receive a proper diagnosis and treatment.

    A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan from Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

    What to Know About a Broken Toe

    Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

    Symptoms of a Broken Toe

    • Throbbing pain
    • Swelling
    • Bruising on the skin and toenail
    • The inability to move the toe
    • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
    • Tingling or numbness in the toe

    Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

    Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

    If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

    Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
    Published in Blog
    Monday, 06 November 2017 17:39

    Bunions and How They are Treated

    bunion is a deformity that occurs on the joint at the base of the big toe. Though the exact cause of bunions is somewhat disputed, wearing tight fitting shoes and genetics tend to play a role in the development and exacerbation of them. Common symptoms that are usually associated with bunions include swelling, soreness, pain, and redness around the joint and bump. Bunions can become worse over time, and poorly-supportive footwear, like high heels, have been associated with worsening them. It is recommended to see a podiatrist when you notice a bunion forming even when it does not cause pain. If you have a bunion that is causing you pain, you should see one right away. A podiatrist will generally offer non-surgical options first if the bunion is not severe. These include bunion pads to relieve pressure off the bunion, pain and anti-inflammatory medication, and suggesting roomier shoes. If the pain continues or worsens and all non-surgical options have failed, surgery may be considered.

    If you are suffering from bunions, contact Dr. Kenneth Donovan of Advanced Care Foot and Ankle. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

    What Is a Bunion?

    A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

    Why Do Bunions Form?

    Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

    Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

    How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

    Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

    How Are Bunions Treated?

    • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
    • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
    • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
    • Orthotics or foot inserts
    • Surgery

    If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Warren, Livingston, and Toms River, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

    Read more about Bunions

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